KURODATOEN

Artist Biography

Great Masters of the Past

Arakawa, Toyozo

Toyozo Arakawa was born in Tajimi, Gifu in 1894. He started working at a trading company in Kobe but he quit soon after. Then he began an apprenticeship with a ceramic dealer in Tajimi. Toyozo excavated and researched pottery pieces in Ogaya, Mino, then proved that Mino was the birth place of Shino ware during 1930. Toyozo was selected as a Living National Treasure for his Shino and Setoguro (Black Seto) work in 1955. He won the Order of Culture in 1968. He died in 1985.

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Ishiguro, Munemaro

Munemaro Ishiguro was born in 1893. He won the silver prize at the Paris Exposition in 1937. He toured around China and Korea in 1940. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for his Iron Glaze works in 1955. He became an honorary citizen of Shinminato City in Toyama in 1956. He created Japan's first "Konoha-Tenmoku". He died in 1968.

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Itaya, Hazan

Hazan Itaya was born in Shimodate, Ibaragi in 1872. He entered the Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (Currently, Tokyo University of the Arts) in 1889. He had learned the curving technique in sculpture with Tenshin Okakura and Koun Takamura. He graduated from that university in 1894. He worked at Kaisei Yobiko (Kaisei Preparatory School) since 1894. He left for his new post as a professor in the Ishikawa School of Technology majoring in wood craft in 1896. He got started in the research of styles and crafts in Art Nouveau. He named himself “Hazan”in 1903. He had created several important works for Japan’s Imperial Household Agency and won the awards of the Art society of Japan. He won the Order of Culture in 1953. He was appointed with a painter, Taikan Yokoyama, as honorary citizens for Ibaragi prefecture in 1954. Hazan was nominated as a Living National Treasure but he declined in 1960. The Hazan Itaya Museum was established in 1963. In that year, he died at the age 91.

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Udagawa, Hosei

Hosei Udagawa was born in Yamaguchi in 1946. After graduating from high school, He built the Tanmyo-zan kiln with his elder brother, Seikoku, in 1972. He built his own Hakuto-zan kiln in 1982. He held a solo exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 1983. He created several variations of Hagi ware. He died at 47, in 1993.

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Okabe, Mineo

Mineo Okabe was born in Seto City, Aich in 1919.
He entered Yogyo (ceramic industry) Vocational Training Institute of Aich Prefecture in 1932.He got involved in a scandal that is called “Einin-no-tsubo” (Jars that were made in Einin period) in 1939.He won the 1st Ceramic Institute prize in 1955.He built his home studio in Nisshin Town in 1968.He made a pair of celadon flower vases and gave them to the Imperial Household Agency in 1969. He died at 70 in 1990. An exhibition of Mineo Okabe was held around Tokyo, Nagoya, Gifu, Hyogo, and Ibaragi during 2007.Another exhibition of Mineo Okabe was held at the Tokyo Art Fair and also our gallery space (both were produced by us) in the spring of 2008.

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Kagoshima, Juzo

Juzo Kagoshima was born in Fukuoka in 1898. He studied the creation of Hakata dolls (porcelain dolls) under Yonejiro Arioka. He established his own kiln in 1917. He decided to move to Tokyo to learn the terra-cotta technique and studied drawing under Saburosuke Okada in 1918. He became a member of “Araragi”(a poetry group) and was coached on the ways of poetry. Juzo established the Research Institute of Paper Crafts Arts of Japan and the Community of Dolls Arts in 1934. He had published a “Tanka” (thirty-on syllable verse) journal since 1945. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for paper dolls in 1961. He died in 1982.

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Kato, Takuo

Takuo Kato was born in Tajimi, Gifu in 1917. He studied ceramic art under his father Kobe Kato. He went to Finland at 1965 and studied at a polytechnic. He studied Persian ceramics at ancient Iranian kiln sites. He won an award from the Japan Ceramic Society in 1991. He was selected as an Important Intangible Cultural Asset for his three-color techniques in 1995. He recreated lusterwares, Blue-glaze ware, three-color ware, and Persian colored ceramics. Takuo died in 2005.

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Kato, Tokuro

Tokuro Kato was born in Seto, Aichi in 1898. He searched for the roots of Seto and tried to re-create Oribe, Kiseto (yellow Seto), and Shino wares in the Momoyama era's style. He pursued "something new" all his lifetime. He was a chief director of the Japan Ceramic Society and Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts. He was nominated as a Living National Treasure for his Kiseto work, but he didn't accept it. He died in 1985.

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Kato, Hajime

Hajime Kato was born in Seto, Aichi in 1900. He became an assistant at the Aichi College of Ceramics in 1914. He won a grand prix at the Paris Expo in 1937. Hajime established own kiln in Hiyoshi, Yokohama in 1940. He had researched and restored ancient Chinese ceramics and styles. He was selected as an intangible cultural asset for his yellow and red paint technique in 1951. He won a grand prix at the Brussels Expo in 1959. He was selected as an important intangible cultural assets member in 1961. He died in 1968.
He died in 1968.

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Kaneshige, Sozan

Sozan Kaneshige was born in Bizen, Okayama in 1909.Sozan started his career as an assistant to his elder brother Toyo Kaneshige. Sozan built his own kiln in Maruyama, Okayama, having perfected "fire marks" by using an electric kiln in 1964, then he built another kiln in Inbe, Okayama.He became a holder of important intangible cultural assets designated by Okayama in 1983.He died in 1995.

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Kaneshige, Toyo

Toyo Kaneshige was born in Okayama in 1896. He helped establishing the museum of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1955. He was selected as a living national treasure for his Bizen works in 1956. Toyo was called the father of re-establishment for Bizen ware. .
He died in 1967.

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Kaneshige, Michiaki

Michiaki Kaneshige was born the first son of Toyo Kaneshige in Inbe, Okayama in 1934. He graduated from Kanazawa College of Art in 1956. He won the grand prix of Asahi Contemporary Ceramic Arts and since then, he’d won several awards. He held an individual exhibition in East Germany in 1976. He won an award from the Japan Ceramic Society in 1980. He joined the exhibition of extreme Bizen wares from the origins to the contemporary, produced by the Smithsonian Institution, in the USA, in 1983. He joined several ceramic exhibitions in West Germany during 1984. He died at the age of 61 in 1995.

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Kamoda, Shoji

Shoji Kamoda was born in Okayama in 1933. He entered Kyoto City University of the Arts and studied under Kenkichi Tomimoto and Yuzo Kondo in 1952. He built his own kiln in Mashiko in 1961. He won the Kotaro Takamura award in 1967. He moved to Tono City, Iwate in 1969. Regretfully, he died at the early age of forty-nine 1983.

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Kawai, Kanjiro

Kanjiro Kwai was born in Shimane in 1890. He entered Tokyo Institute of Technology majoring in ceramic arts in 1910. He and his classmate Shoji Hamada studied Ancient Chinese ceramics instructed by their teacher Hazan Itaya. He established his own kiln called Shokei-Yo at Gojozaka, Kyoto in 1920. He joined Mingei Undo (Mingei Movement; a discovery of the innocent and plane beauty of everyday wares made by unknown craftsmen) with Shoji Hamada, Soetsu Yanagi, and some others in 1926. He won a grand prix at the Paris Expo in 1937. Kanjiro was both a poet and an artist. He was nominated as Order of Cultural Merit, a Living National Treasure, and some other honorable awards and titles. But he declined. He won a grand prix at the Exhibition of La Triennale di Milano in 1956. He died at the age 76 with no titles and uncrowned in 1966.

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Kawakita, Handeishi

He was born in Higashi-ku, Osaka in 1878. Handeishi learnt Western Art under Takeji Fujishima at Jinjo junior-high school in Mie prefecture in 1894. He entered Tokyo Senmon Gakko (currently, Waseda University) in 1900 (He quit next year). He entered the Hyakugo Bank as a director when he was 25. He was elected a council member of Tsu City in 1909 and a council member of Mie prefecture in 1910. He bought Chitose Mountain which is in the suburb of Tsu City in 1912. He traveled to China and Korea and brought several clays back to Japan in 1913. He became a top of the Hyakugo Bank in 1916 (until 1945). He started learning Japanese traditional arts under Arinobu Mitani who was the painter of the Kano School. He took the presidendental chair of Mie Godo Denki Gaisha (currently, Chubu Electric Power) in 1922. He established a coal kiln at Northern Chitose Mountain in 1925. He established a wood fuel kiln designed by Fujio Koyama at Southern Chitose Mountain in 1933 (but, ill fated). He built the third noborigama (rising kiln) called Chitosegama designed by himself in 1934 and succeeded in the first firing. He formed Karahine kai (Karahine meeting) with Toyozo Arakawa and Toyo Kaneshige in 1942. He resigned from the director’s position and became a chairman of Hyakugo Bank. He moved to Chitosegama to Hase Mountain which is in the suburbs of Tsu City in 1946. He became a executive advisor at Hyakugo Bank in 1950. He won the Blue Ribbon Medal. He died at the age 84 in 1963.He died at the age 84 in 1963.

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Kitaohji, Rosanjin

RosanjKitaohji was born in Kyoto in 1883. He founded the "Bishoku Club”(Gourmet Club) in 1921. The Bishoku club became a private restaurant, the "Hoshigaoka-saryo Restaurant", in 1925. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for his Oribe work, but he declined in 1955. He died in 1959.

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Kumagai, Morikazu

Morikazu Kumagai was born in 1880. His parents were land owners and managed a spinning company. He entered Keio University in 1897 but quit soon after, and entered Kyoritsu Art Museum in 1898. He entered Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (currently, Tokyo University of the Arts) in 1900. He had a friendship with Shigeru Aoki, an Oil Painter. He joined The 2nd Nishina Exhibition in 1915. Since that year, he had joined every year until Nishina exhibition was wound up by the armed force later year. He declined the Order of Cultural Merit in 1968. He declined the conferment of the Order of the Rising Sun in 1972. He died in 1977.He died in 1977.

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Kuroda, Tatsuaki

He was born in Kioicho, Kyoto in 1904. His parents were in the doing lacquer business. He established the Institution of Kamigamo Mingei with Soetsu Yanagi in 1927. He created a studio set for a film in Gotenba at Akira Kurosawa (a famous filmmaker’s) request in 1964. He completed a series of art work at the new palace in 1968. He was selected as an Important Intangible Cultural Asset in 1970 and won a Purple Ribbon Medal in 1971. His life story titled “Tatsuaki Kuroda; Hito to Sakuhin” (Tatsuaki Kuroda; His Humanity and Works) was published in 1976. He was nominated as the Person of Cultural Merit by Kyoto City in 1976. He died in 1982.

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Koyama, Fujio

Fujio Koyama was born in Okayama in 1900. He worked in the Tokyo Teishitsu Museum (current Tokyo National Museum), and then joined the Intangible Culture Division of Cultural Properties Protection Committee. He built his own kiln called "Hananoki-gama" in Toki City in 1972. Koyama made a great contribution to research in ancient potteries. He died in 1975.

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Osamu, Suzuki

Osamu Suzuki was born in Kyoto as the third son in 1926. His father was a lathe master. Osamu established "Sodei-sha" with Kazuo Yagi in 1948. He won the prize of the Japan Ceramic Society in 1961. He won the Golden prize at the International Pottery Exhibition in Prague in 1962. He became an assistant professor in a ceramic art course at Osaka University of Arts in 1968. He won the Golden prize at the Biennale International Pottery Exhibition in Vallauris in 1970. He won the Minister for Trade prize at the International Pottery Exhibition in Faenza in 1971. In 1975, he exhibited at the International Pottery Exhibition '75 and in 1979, his works were exhibited at the Art Now '79. He hold Objet d'art of poetry- Ceramics by Osamu Suzuki at the National Museum Art, Tokyo in 1999. He died at the age 73 in 2001.

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Tamura, Koichi

Koichi Tamura was born in Tochigi, in 1918. After graduating from Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (currently, Tokyo University of the Arts), he started studying under Kenkichi Tomimoto. He won the gold medal prize from the Japan Ceramic Institute in 1958. He became a professor at Tokyo University of the Arts in 1977. He was selected as an Important Intangible Cultural Asset for his iron paint technique in 1986. He died in 1987..

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1st Tokuda, Yasokichi

Yasokichi Tokuda was born in Komatsu Daimonji-cho, Nomi-county (currently, Komatsu City) in Ishikawa in 1873. He studied under his brother-in-law, Sahei Matsumoto, and entered the field of ceramic arts in 1890. He was ordered by Ishikawa prefecture to create flower vases in commemoration of Togu Denka's wedding in 1928. He was also ordered by Komatsu-cho to create Raku figurines in commemoration of the coronation of Taisho Emperor in 1928. He was selected as an Important Intangible Cultural Asset in 1953.

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Tsukamoto, Kaiji

Kaiji Tsukamoto was born in Toki, Gifu in 1912. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for his work in white and bluish porcelain in 1983. He died in 1990.

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Tsuji, Seimei

Seimei Tsuji was born in Setegaya, Tokyo in 1927.He took an interest in making ceramics from an early age and learnt how to use a potter’s wheel at age 11. He established the Tsuji Ceramic Laboratory “Tsuji Touki Kenkyujo” with his elder sister, Teruko, in 1941. He established “Shinkoujin Kyokai” the New Technology and Human Society organization in 1951. He built a studio and a “nobori gama” (rising kiln) at Renkoji temple in Tama City in 1955. He had an exhibition at Gotoh Museum in 1963. He won the Japan Ceramic Society prize in 1983. He published picture books in 1982, 1986, and 1996. He collaborated with Shogo Kariyazaki, who is one of the foremost young flower artists in Japan, and held a special exhibition named“Ka-en” (Flowers and Flame) in 2006. He held a “Seimei Tsuji Sotuju-ten” a commemoration exhibition (becoming age 90) in 2007. He died in 2008.

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Tomimoto, Kenkichi

Kenkichi Tomimoto was born in Ando Village, Nara in 1886. He was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit in 1951. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for his work in enameled porcelain in 1955. He died in 1963.

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Nakazato, Muan

Muan Nakazato was the second son of the 11th Taroemon Nakazato in Karatsu, Saga in 1895. He graduated from Arita School of Technology in 1914. He succeeded the name, Taroemon Nakazato the 12th in 1927. He made some art pieces at the Chitose kiln which was owned by Handeishi Kawakita, in 1937. He ended ordinary excavation at Fujinokouchi, Imari City in 1940. He was selected as in Important Intangible Cultural Asset of Karatsu ware in 1955. He became a deputy general manager at Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts. He established a nobori-gama (rising kiln) in Ochawan-gama (an ancient place for the government kiln) in 1965. He won the Purple Ribbon Medal in 1969. He won the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1969. He got into religion at Daitoku temple in Kyoto and was given the priest name Muan. He became an Important Intangible Cultural Assets Holder of Karatsu ware in 1976. He died at 90 in 1985.

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Nakamura, Rokuro

Rokuro Nakamura was born in Okayama in 1914. In 1945, Rokuro started studying under Toyo Kaneshige. He won Orders of the Precious Crown. He died in 2004.

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Nishioka, Koju

Koju Nishioka was born in Karatsu, Saga in 1917. Koju studied under Fujio Koyama. He began excavation and research of old kilns and developed the re-creation of ancient Karatsu. He remained uncrowned. He died in 2006.

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Hamada, Shoji

Shoji Hamada was born in Kanagwa in 1894. He entered the high school of Tokyo Institute of Technology and met Hazan Itaya (Itaya worked at the school) in 1913. After graduation, Shoji worked with Kanjiro Kawai in Kyoto. He went to England with Bernard Leach and they established a kiln together. He achieved big success from several individual exhibitions. After coming back to Japan, he moved to Okinawa, the southest Island in Japan and learned the traditional technique of Okinawa ceramics during 1924. He began his work in Mashiko in 1930. He was selected as an important intangible cultural asset for his Folk Art Ceramic in 1955. He won an Order of Culture in 1968. Sankokan Mashiko (Shoji Hamada Museum) was established in 1977. He died in 1978 at age of 83.

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Kyohei, Fujita

Kyohei Fujita was born in Shinjuku, Tokyo in 1921. He graduated from Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (Currently, Tokyo University of the Arts), in 1944. He entered Iwata Glass Co. Ltd. in 1947. He started holding individual exhibitions in Tokyo in 1957. He received high praise in Denmark when he joined the World Glass Studio Exhibition in 1975. He took up a chairman’s position of the Japan Glass Arts Association in 1976. He published a photo collection of his own pieces in 1980. The Kyohei Fujita Museum was built in Matsushima, Miyagi in 1996. He won the Cultural Order Award in 1997. He became an honorary citizen of Ichikawa City, Chiba. He won the Order of Culture in 2002. He died in 2004.

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Fujimoto, Yoshimichi

Yoshimichi Fujimoto was born in Tokyo in 1919. After graduating from Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (Currently, Tokyo University of the Arts), he began studying ceramics under Hajime Kato. He met Kenkich Tomimoto in 1938 and became an assistant of Kenkich and learnt the Iroe (multi-colored porcelain) technique. He won an award from The Japan Ceramic Society in 1956. He established a kiln in Ohme, Tokyo. Fujimoto joined the board directors of Tokyo University of the Arts in 1985. He was selected as an important intangible cultural asset for his Iroe work in 1986. He died in 1992.

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Fujiwara, Kei

Kei Fujiwara was born in Bizen, Okayama in 1899. He became a holder of Important Intangible Cultural Assets designated by Okayama in 1970. He opened The Kei Fujiwara Art Museum in Bizen, Okayama in 1977. Fujiwara died in 1983.

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Fujiwara, Yu

Yu Fujiwara was born in Bizen, Okayama in 1932. He studied under his father, Kei Fujiwara. He became a executive on the board of directors for the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1988. He was selected as an important intangible cultural asset for his Bizen work in 1996. He died in 2001.

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Maeda, Seison

Seison Maeda was born in Nakatsu City, Gifu in 1885. He lived with his uncle. He entered a private school which was run by Hankichi Kajita, recommended by Koyo Ozaki, a novelist, in 1901. He was given artist name ”Seison” by his master, Hankich Kajita. He was put forward to be a councilor at The Japan Art Institute in 1918. He studied Europe with Kokei Kobayashi, a painter in 1922. He was evacuated to Nakatsugawa City during war time. After World War II, he went back to his hometown, North Kamakura. He became a professor at Tokyo University of Arts in 1950. He won the award, the Order of Cultural Merit and was selected as an honorary citizen of Nakatsugawa City in 1955. He took command of reconstructing the wall paintings at the main hall of Horyuji temple with Kurahiko Yasuda in 1967. He created a room which was called Ishibashino Ma (A space of stone bridge) at the new palace in 1970. He was asked to reconstruct the wall of Takamatsu-zuka tomb in 1972. He died at the age 92 in Kamakura in 1977.

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Matsui, Kosei

Kosei Matsui was born in Nagano in 1927. He became the 23rd Jodosogetsu-shu resident priest in 1957. He studied under Koichi Tamura and researched ancient Chinese ceramic techniques. He became a director at the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1988. He won the gold medal at the Japan Ceramic Society in 1990. He was selected as a Living national Treasure for his “neri-age (handling colored clay)” in 1993. He died in 2003.

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Miura, Koheiji

Koheiji Miura was born in Sado, Nigata in 1933. He graduated from Tokyo University of the Arts. He studied ceramic arts under Hajime Kato and mastered a technique of traditional blue celadon. He became a professor at Tokyo University of the Arts in 1990. He was selected as living national treasure for his blue celadon work in 1997. He became a member of the board of directors at the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 2000. He died in 2006.

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Miwa, Eizo

Eizo Miwa was born in Yamaguchi in 1946. Eizo was the second son of the 11th Kyusetsu Miwa. Eizo graduated from Musashino Art University. He became a member of the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1982. Regretfully, he died at the early age of fifty-two in 1999.

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Miwa, Kyuwa

Kyuwa Miwa was born the second son of the Setsudo Miwa the 9th (traditional ceramic family under imperial domain) in Yamaguchi in 1895. He started to take tea lessons under Edo-senke (one of the tea schools) and Youkyoku (noh song) under Hoshou-ryu (second biggest noh family) in 1911. He organized a meeting that is called Karahine with Handeish Kawakita, Toyozo Arakawa, and Toyo Kaneshige in 1942. He was appointed as a member of the board of Conservation Arts and Crafts in Yamaguchi prefecture in 1943. He was recommended as an administration officer at Omote-senke (one of the major tea schools), Yamaguchi branch in 1954. He was selected as an Important Intangible Cultural Asset of Yamaguchi in 1956. He was recommended as a board chairman in the Yamaguchi Ceramic Association in 1957. He became a regular member at Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in the same year. He created an unique tea bowl and offered it to the emperor in commemoration of “Kyusetsu kokyu no kai” (turning 70 years old) in 1965. He retired and named himself Kyuwa and won the Purple Ribbon Medal in 1967. He won the Order of the Rising Sun in 1973. He died at 86 in 1981.

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Yagi, Kazuo

Kazuo Yagi was born in Kyoto in 1918. He was the first son of Isso Yagi. Kazuo established "Sodei-sha" with Osamu Suzuki in 1948. He won the Golden Prize of Oostende National Pottery Making Award in 1959. He won the Golden Prize of Prague National Pottery Making Award in 1971. He became a professor at Kyoto City University of Arts. He won the Golden Prize of Japan Ceramic Society in 1973. He died in 1979.

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Yamaguchi, Takeo (*popular name; Chonan)

Takeo Yamaguchi was born in Keijo (currently called Soul, Korea) during the Japan-Russia war in 1902. He lived in Keijo until he was 19. After that, he went to Tokyo and studied European arts under Saburosuke Okada. He studied in Paris with his classmate Takanori Ogisu (who became a famous European artist later) after leaving Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (currently, Tokyo University of the Arts). He met Yuzo Saeki who was also studying painting in Paris (Saeki became a famous European artist later) and was strongly influenced by him. Yamaguchi was also influenced by Picasso, Brach, and Zadkine. He went back Keijo and started his abstract style of painting since 1931. Since that year, he had often joined Nishina exhibition by Keijo. He organized an artist group called “Kyushitsu-kai” with some Nishina members such as Jiro Yoshihara and so on in 1938. During the Second World War, he was sent to Pusan in Korea and soon after, the war was over in 1945. He left Keijo and came back to Tokyo in 1946. He joined the establishment of the Japan Abstract Art Club in 1953. He joined an abstract arts exhibition held in New York as a member in 1954. He joined the 3rd Biennale (one of the major art events) held in Sao Paulo in 1955. He joined the 28th Biennale held in Venetia in 1956. He won a prize from the Encouragement Ministry of Education in 1961. He died in 1983.

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Yamamoto, Toshu

Toshu Yamamoto was born in Bizen, Okayama in 1906. He studied under Yaichi Kusube. He became a board member for the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1970. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for his Bizen technique in 1987. He was called one of Japan’s foremost architects. He died in 1994.

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Yoshiga, Taibi

Taibi Yoshiga was born in Hagi, Yamaguchi in 1915. He graduated from Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko (currently, Tokyo University of the Arts) department of sculpture in 1938. He won the Hokuto award at the 11th Nitten (Japan Fine Arts Exhibition) in 1955. He became an assistant professor at Yamaguchi Daigaku in the department of education during 1953-67. He won the Blue Ribbon and Hokuto award at 13th Nitten exhibition in 1957. He became a council member in Nitten and became a professor at Yamaguchi Geijutsu Tanki Daigaku (Yamaguchi College of Arts) until 1985. He won the prime minister award at the reorganized 1st Nitten exhibition in 1969. He won the Japan Art Academy award and became a director at Nitten in 1971. He became a member of the Japan Art Academy in 1982. He became a managing director of Nitten in 1983. He won the gold prize from The Japan Ceramic Society in 1985. He won the order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, in 1986. Taibi won the Cultural Order Award in 1990. He died in 1991.

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Current Artists

= Bizen & Yakishime =

Ema, Hiroshi

Hiroshi Ema was born in Tokyo in 1953. He graduated from Jochi University (Sophia University) in 1977. He graduated from the Bizen Ceramic Art Center in 1992. He built his own anagama (underground kiln) in 1994. He has been holding solo exhibitions since 1997.

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Ohgiri, Tai

Tai Ogiri was born in Okayama in 1967. His father, Kunimitsu Ohgiri, was a sculptor. He graduated from Osaka Geijutsu Daigaku (Osaka University of Arts) in 1989. He studied under Shuroku Harada in 1990. He became independent and built his own kiln in 1995. He has been holding solo exhibitions at our gallery since 2000.

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Kakurezaki, Ryuichi

Ryuichi Kakurezaki was born in Nagasaki in 1950. He graduated from Osaka University of Arts in 1973. He also won a prize for encouragement at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Figurative Arts Exhibition by the Tanabe Museum of Art in 1988. He won a Mokichi Okada award at the competition held by MOA (MOA Museum of Art) in 1995. He won a Japan Ceramic Society award in 1996. He joined the exhibition called Fascination of the Bizen wares; Tradition and Creation in 2004.

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Kaneshige, Iwao

Iwao Kaneshige was born into one of the famous Yakimono families named “Kaneshige” in Bizen, Okayama in 1965. He studied ceramic art under his father Michiaki Kaneshige who was the first son of Toyo Michiaki. He became independent in 1995. In the same year, he joined the exhibition named Michiaki Kaneshige and his family produced by Shibuya Kurodatoen in 1995. He has been holding solo and group exhibitions at our gallery space since 2003.

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Kaneshige, Kosuke

Kosuke Kaneshige was born in Okayama in 1943. He is the second son of Michiaki Kaneshige. He graduated from Tokyo Geijutsu Daigaku (Tokyo University of the Arts) in 1970. He has been making presentations of his art works since 1975. He built his own kiln in 1982. He won an award at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Figurative Arts Exhibition at the Tanabe Museum of Art in 1982. He has given an outstanding performance at several competitions.

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Kaneshige, Makoto

Makoto Kaneshige was born as the first son of Sozan Kaneshige who was Toyo Kaneshige’s younger brother in 1945. After graduating from Kyoto University in 1979, he became independent in 1979. He joined a Bizen exhibition held at Paris in 1997. He has held several solo exhibitions in Tokyo, Osaka, Okayama, and Munich (Germany). He won prizes for encouragement at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Figurative Arts Exhibition by the Tanabe Museum of Art and Tanko Biennale exhibition.

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Kaneshige, Yuho

Yuho Kaneshige was born the second son of Sozan Kaneshige (he is the younger brother of Toyo Kaneshige), in Okayama in 1950. After dropping out of Musashino Bijutsu Daigaku (Musashino Art University) he studied under his father. He has held solo exhibitions in several places. He won the Japan Ceramic Society award in 2003. He also won prizes for encouragement at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Figurative Arts Exhibition by the Tanabe Museum of Art and Tanko Biennale exhibition.

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Kumano, Kuroemon

Kuroemon Kumano was born in Fukui in 1955. He started studying under Jurouemon Fujita, who was an Important Intangible Cultural Asset of Fukui prefecture, in 1976. He studied under Soshiro Toda in 1982. He had another apprenticeship with Jurouemon Fujita in 1983. Kuroemon was invited by Soviet government and gave them kiln firing instruction in 1985. He was invited by Sakhalin in 1986. He built his own kiln in 1987. He was invited by Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Germany in 2000.

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Shimamura, Hikaru

Hikaru Shimamura was born in Okayama in 1942. He graduated from Naniwa Tanki Daigaku (Naniwa Junior Collage). He built his own anagama (underground kiln) in Osafune, Okayama in 1978. He was appointed to make a statue in front of Sabukaze Togeikaikan (Sabukaze Ceramic Museum) in Ushimado-town in 1987. He built his own noborigama (rising kiln) in 1992. His first solo exhibition titled “Okuretekita neko (a cat showing up late)” was held at our gallery in 1997. He built an anagama (underground kiln) in 2004.

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Suehiro, Manabu

Manabu Suehiro was born in Osaka in 1966. He studied under Togaku Mori in 1985. He joined the first firing at Sabukaze Ogama (a great Sabukaze kiln project conducted by Togaku Mori and his fellows). He became independent in 1993. He has been holding solo exhibitions since 1997. He won an award at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Exhibition at the Tanabe Museum of Art in 2004.

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Takariki, Yoshiteru

Yoshiteru Takariki was born in Hyogo in 1970. He studied under Sozan Kaneshige and Yuho Kaneshige in 1970. He became independent and built his own kiln in 1996. He has been holding solo exhibitions since 2003. He won an award at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Exhibition at the Tanabe Museum of Art in 2004.

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Nakamura, Makoto

Makoto Nakamura was born as the first son of Rokuro Nakamura in 1949. Makoto studied ceramics under Michiaki Kaneshige. He became independent in 1975. He has eagerly been holding solo exhibitions in several places such as Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Okayama.

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Nomura, Ichiro

Nomura, Ichiro Ichiro Nomura was born in Okayama in 1953. He started ceramic study in Bizen in 1981. His first firing (“Hatsugama”) was held in Nishisho, Okayama in 1991. He had another first firing held in Ohgashimaji, Okayama in 2007.

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Harada, Shuroku

Shuroku Harada was born in Okayama in 1941. He has started art work since 1969. He built his own anagama (underground kiln) in 1971. He built a noborigama (rising kiln) in 1972. He met Matasaburo Katsura and studied under him, then started Old Bizen research in 1975. He won an award at the Japan Ceramic Society in 2000. He joined the Memorial exhibition at the Museum of Modern Ceramic Art in Gifu in 2002.

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Fujioka, Shuhei

Shuhei Fujioka was born in Ehime in 1947. Shuhei graduated from Ritsumeikan University in 1970. He studied under Mitsuo Tanimoto. He built his own kiln in Ueno City, Mie in 1975. He has energetically been holding both solo and group exhibitions since 1987. He joined the 4th International Contemporary Art Festival and held a solo exhibition in 1995.

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Mori, Togaku

Togaku Mori was born in Okayama in 1937. He began research into Ko-Bizen (old Bizen) in 1966. He established an O-gama (great kiln) in Hyogo in 1980. After that, Mori established another O-gama measuring 53 meters in length in Gyuso, Okayama. He became a member of the important intangible cultural assets designated by Okayama, in 1996. He won the award of the Japan Ceramic Society Gold Prize in 2002. He was awarded the Purple Ribbon Medal in 2006.

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Yokoyama, Naoki

Yokoyama was born in 1970. He started learning Yakimono at Bizen Pottery Art Center in 1991. He won the award of "Form of Cha-no-Yu” presented by The Tanabe Museum of Art in 1994. Yokoyama won a prize at the Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art competition in 1997. He won a prize in "The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art Crafts” and “The Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art” competitions in 1998. He won a prize in “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art Crafts” and “The Encouraging Prize” of The Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art in 1999. He built his own kiln and won a prize in “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts” and “The Encouraging Prize” of The Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art in 2000. He won the award of "Form of Cha-no-Yu” presented by The Tanabe Museum of Art, “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts”, and a prize in “The Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art” in 2001. He won a prize in “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts” and The Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art in 2002. He won a prize in “The Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition” and “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts” in 2002. He had an individual exhibition at Tenmaya and won a prize in “The Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition” and “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts” competitions in 2003.

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Wani, Eiko

Eiko Wani was born in Hiroshima in 1944. He became a disciple of Toyo Kaneshige. After Toyo died, he studied under Michiaki Kaneshige and Sozan Kaneshige. Eiko became independent in 1975. He joined the exhibition of the Kaneshige family in 1977. He won the grand prize at the Chano-yu (Tea Ceremony) Exhibition at the Tanabe Museum of Art in 1999.

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Nagaoka, Masami

Masami Nagaoka was born in Shiga in 1948. He studied under Norio Kamiya in 1970. He became independent in Fujisawa, Kanagawa in 1972. He built his own anagama (underground kiln) in Shuzenji, Shizuoka in 1976. He has been holding solo exhibitions since 1995.

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= Karatsu & Hagi =

Kajiwara, Yasumoto

Yasumoto Kajiwara was born in Saga in 1962. He studied under the Karatsu artist, Sozan Eguchi in 1980 and a Hokuho Daimaru in Kyoto in 1989. Before becoming independent in 1995, he visited and learned his skill from several major ceramic places. He built his own kilns in Oh-uchi in 1998 and Sari in 2001, both in Karatsu, Saga. He excavated some ancient kilns in Korea in 2002. He studied ancient Korean ceramic pieces in Korea for three months in 2003.

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Kaneta, Masanao

He was born in Hagi, Yamaguchi in 1953. He graduated from university and began studying under his father Sanzaemon Kaneta in 1979. He became a regular member of the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1985, but resigned his membership in 1991. He was teaching at University of Tsukuba Art and Design as an assistant professor during 2000 to 2003.

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Kikuchi, Katsu

Katsu Kikuchi was born in Tokyo in 1972. He graduated from Aoyama Gakuin University, department of Economics in 1996. In the same year, he went to Spain to study. He has studied under Nakagawa Jinenbo in 2001. He built his own kiln in Ohita in 2008. He has been holding solo exhibitions and joined group exhibitions in various places.

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Tanaka, Sajiro

Sajiro Tanaka was born in Kita-Kyushu in Fukuoka in 1937. Sajiro graduated from Daiichi Koutou Gakko (Daiichi high school) in 1956. He began his ceramic career by the “tebineri (hand-pinching)" method in 1965. Sajiro excavated several places and researched ancient pottery pieces that were made in the Jomon and Yayoi era. Sajiro went to Eihei-ji (Eihei temple) to learn the practice of Zen with the superior of Eihei-ji Fumio Murakami’s recommendation in 1971. He began excavation of ancient Karatsu ceramic pieces at Hizen area and creating Karatsu works. He learned Calligraphy under a chirographer Keishu Toh. He learned the manner of the tea ceremony under Masumi Hanada, a tea master of Omote Senke (Foundation of Fushin-an). Sajiro studied “Nanshu-ga.”(the southern school of Chinese painting) under Chikukei Takahara in 1972. Sajiro went to Eihei-ji to practice the art of Zen and joined “Genzo-e” (kind of Buddhism meeting) preached by a priest Rosen Kamatani in 1973. 1975, Sajiro received a Buddhist priest name “Zenkai Hogetsu” by a Zen master, Reirin Yamada. He built a rising kiln on the premises of Handa Joraku-ji (Joraku temple) in Karatsu. Sajiro received a commendatory letter from Mr. Ryoichi Sasakawa, a chairman at the Japan Shipbuilding Industry Foundation in 1978. Sajiro met Tokuro Kato, the great Shino artist, for the first time after taking Zen practice at Eihei-ji in 1979. Sajiro met Tomio Ito, the chairman at Itoh Dental Clinic & General Hospital in Nagasaki in 1980. Sajiro went to Eihei-ji to take Zen practice. He learnt ancient Chinese poetry under Soshu Saito in 1983. Sajiro started holding solo exhibitions in 1985. Sajiro built his own kiln named “Yamase” at ancient kiln site which is 700 meters above sea level in 1987. Sajiro learnt the art of flower arrangement under Kangetsu Kusaba in 1989. Sajiro published a picture book titled “Toh (The Ceramic)” by Kyoto Shoin (a publishing company) in 1990. Sajiro held a solo exhibition at the Daiichi Gallery in New York in 1994. Sajiro applied to make souvenir gifts when the former British Prime Minister Thatcher visited Saga prefecture and joined the tea ceremony in 1996. Sajiro was featured in a book titled Ceramic Renaissance of the 21st Century published by Doho-sha in 1997. His solo exhibition “The Thirty Tea Bowls” in commemoration of Shibuya Kurodatoen 30th anniversary was held by us in 1998. His solo exhibition “The Ten Ido Ware Tea Bowls” was held by us in 2000. Sajiro built the rising kiln named “Kizan” at Ulsan was offered by Mr. Kim Tein in 2003. His solo exhibition “Korai Tea Bowls” was held at Shibuya Kuroatoen in 2004. Sajiro went to Eihei-ji for Zen practice and joined “Genzo-e” (kind of Buddhism meeting) given by the priest, Tairyu Matsubara in 2007. His solo exhibitions “Karatsu and Korai for Sake” and “Korai Tea Bowls” in commemoration of Shibuya Kurodatoen 40th anniversary was held by us in 2008.

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Nakagawa, Jinenbo

Jinenbo Nakagawa was born in Saga in 1953. Jinenbo studied under Touya Inoue in 1953. He became independent and built his own kiln in 1982. He held his first solo exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 1985. He started pushing himself to reproduce Oku-gorai and Oh-ido Chawan (Old Korean type tea bowls) in 2000.

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Nishikawa, Mitsuharu

Mitsuharu Nishikawa was born in 1964. He has studied under Tanaka Sajiro in Karatsu City in 1983. He built his own kiln, Kitahata-gama in 2002. He exhibited for Tea Cup exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 2009 and also for Variety of Sake Cups and Bottles exhibition in 2010. He has been holding solo exhibitions in various places.

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Hamamoto, Hiroyoshi

Hiroyoshi Hamamoto was born in Saga in 1938. He had learnt ceramic art in Karatsu for 13 years. He became independent and built his own kiln and also worked on reconstruction of early Karatsu ware in 1982. He has been holding solo exhibitions at Shibuya Kurodatoen since 1986.

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Maruta, Munehiko

Maruta was born in 1961. He is the second son of Masami Maruta who is one of the most popular ceramists in Kuromuta, Saga. He started studying ceramics under Atsuya Hamada, the third son of Shoji Hamada who was appointed as a Living National Treasure in 1980. Marura went back his hometown (Kuromuta) and started ceramic works in 1984. He won a prize in “The Exhibition of West Arts and Crafts” and “The Exhibition of Saga Art Association” competitions in 1985. Maruta won a prize in “The Exhibition of Western Japan Arts and Crafts”, “The Exhibition of Western Japan Ceramic Art”, “The Exhibition of Saga Art Association”, The Exhibition of Kyushu Neo Arts and Crafts”, “The Exhibition of Issui-kai”, and “The Exhibition of Saga Prefecture” competitions in 1986. He built his own kiln called “Uchida Saraya gama” in 1987. He won several prizes such as “The Exhibition of Western Japan Arts and Crafts”, “The Exhibition of Kyushu Yamaguchi Ceramics”, “The Exhibition of Saga Art Association” and “The Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts” during that year. He also won a premiere prize in competition at “The Exhibition of Kyushu Neo Arts and Crafts” in 1987. He won a prize in “The Exhibition of West Arts and Crafts”, “The Exhibition of Kyushu Yamaguchi Ceramics”, and “The Exhibition of Saga Art Association” competitions in 1988. He won a prize in “The Exhibition of Kyushu Yamaguchi Ceramics”, “The Exhibition of Saga Art Association”, “The Exhibition of Saga Prefecture”, and “The Exhibition of Issui-kai” in 1989. He has been holding individual exhibitions at Shibuya Kurodatoen since 1993. He held an individual exhibition at Umeda Hankyu Hyakkaten, which is a major department store, in 1995. Maruta built his own kiln that is called “Saraya-gawa Nobori-gama (climbing kiln)”, in 2000. He has appeared on national television (NHK/BS) "Utsuwa Yume Kobo" several times since 2002.

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Miwa, Kazuhiko

Kazuhiko Miwa was born the third son of Jusetsu Miwa, the 11th Kyusetsu in 1951. He left to study in USA from 1975 to 1981. He started doing art work at Miwa-gama (a successive kiln of Miwa family) after coming back from abroad in 1981. He held the exhibition named The REI, The Tea Ceremony Room of Kazuhiko Miwa at the Yamaguchi Prefectural Museum of Art in 2000. He joined the exhibition A Hundred Years of Ceramic Art from modern to contemporary in 2002. Kazuhiko joined the exhibition of The Flores of Ceramic Art from modern to contemporary Resounding Colors and Forms at the Ibaraki Ceramic Art Museum in 2003.

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Miwa, Jusetsu (11th Kyusetsu Miwa)

Jusetsu Miwa was born in Hagi, Yamaguchi in 1910. He studied under his elder brother, the 10th Kyusetsu (Kyuwa Miwa). He succeeded his family name "Kyusetsu Miwa" in 1967. He was selected as a Living National Treasure for his Hagi work in 1983. He announced himself as "Jusetsu Miwa" in 2003.

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Miwa, Masatsugu

Masatsugu Miwa was born in Yamaguchi in 1971. He graduated from Aoyama Gakuin University in 1996. He finished his ceramic study at Kyoto-shi Kogyo Shikenjo (the Industry Experimental Laboratory in Kyoto City) in 1998. He has studied under his grandfather, Jusetsu, and his father, Eizo.

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Yano, Naoto

Naoto Yano was born in Saga in 1976. He went to the U.S.A in 1994 and studied there for five years. He graduated from Arita College of Ceramics in 2002. After that he worked at the college as a lecturer. He has been making ceramics at his own kiln, Tonoyama-gama since 2004. In 2008, he made ceramics for six month in Ulsan, Korea. He has been holding solo exhibitions and joined group exhibitions in various places. He held his first individual exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 2014.

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= Shino, Oribe & Kiseto =

Kagami, Shukai

Shukai Kagami was born in Gifu in 1941. He graduated from Komazawa University in 1963. He began studying under Kobe Kato in 1966. He built his own tunnel kiln in 1968. Kagami has held individual exhibitions at Shibuya Kurodatoen several times.

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Kato, Takahiro

Takahiro Kato was born in Aichi in 1972. He departed in 1994 to travel abroad, journeying from China to Russia, through European countries, and finally staying in Granada for a year to study art and Spanish. Since coming back to Japan, he has been working at Shigetaka Kobo (his father’s studio). He has given an outstanding performance in several cities such as Nagoya, Tokyo and Osaka.

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Kato, Ryotaro

Ryotaro Kato was born as the first son of the 7th Kato Kobei in 1974. His grandfather is a living national treasure, Kato Takuo. He graduated from Kyoto Seika University, department of Ceramic Art in 1997. He studied under Matsumoto Hideo while he was at school. He finished his study at Kyoto City University of Arts in 1999. He enterd Kobei-gaka (the family business) in 2000. He has been holding solo exhibitions and joined group exhibitions in various places.

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Koyama, Tomonori

Tomonori Koyama was born in Nagasaki in 1953. He studied under Kiheiji Takiguchi in 1978. He established his own kiln in 1981. Since 1992, he has been holding both individual and group exhibitions at Shibuya Kurodatoen. He appeared on the national television show (NHK/BS) "Utsuwa Yume Kobo" in 2003.

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Suzuki, Osamu

Osamu Suzuki was born in Toki, Gifu in 1964. Osamu graduated from Tajimi Technical High School, department of Ceramic Industry in Gifu in 1953. He entered Maru-ko Toen and studied glaze and clay. He joined the 8th Japanese Ceramic Exhibition and won a honorable mention, and won a prize at the 6th Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition in 1953. He won a grand prix at the International Ceramic Exhibition of Prague in 1962. He won the Governor of Toyama Prefecture Award at the Asahi Ceramic Exhibition in 1963 and 1964, the Governor of Gifu Prefecture Award in 1965 and an outstanding award in 1966. He installed a gas kiln at home in 1964 and started ceramic work. He won several prestigious awards such as a gold prize at The Japan Ceramic Society in 1968 and 1982, the Cultural Award from the Gifu Newspaper and the Education Minister Award in 1987 and much more. He built his own kiln in Kokeizan, Tajimi in 1990. Osamu was selected as a Living National Treasure, for his Shino work, in 1994. Osamu continues creating art in Tajimi, Gifu. He won the Purple Ribbon Medal in 1995.

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Suzuki, Tetsu

Tetsu Suzuki was born in Gifu in 1964. He graduated from Kyoto Prefectural Vocational School for Ceramic Artists in 1988 and started learning from his father, Osamu Suzuki. He became a member of the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts Organization in 1997. He won the newcomer prize at the Japan Traditional Arts and Crafts exhibition in 2003.

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Hori, Ichiro

Ichiro Hori was born in Mizunami, Gifu in 1952. He graduated from High School and started studying under Kozo Kato in 1971. He built his own kiln in 1984. Hori has held individual exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen several times.

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Higuchi, Masayuki

Masayuki Higuchi was born in Gifu in 1967. After graduating from the Nagoya University of Arts, he studied under the Bizen artist, Toshu Yamamoto. He became independent in 1995. Since then, he has been holding exhibitions at several places.

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= Iroe, Seiji & Others =

Ito, Hidehito

Hidehito Ito was born in Tajimi City, Gifu in 1971. He finished his ceramic study at Tajimi City Pottery Design and Technical Center in 1991. He won a prize at the Table Ware Festival in 1995. He built his own kiln in Toki City, Gifu in 1996. He won a prize at the International Ceramic Exhibition in Mino in 1998. He won a prize at the 2nd Modern Pottery for tea ceremony in 2000.

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Imaizumi, Takeshi

Takeshi Imaizumi was born in Saitama in 1978. He graduated from Waseda University, department of Politics and Economics in 2002. After He became independent in 2005, he has been making ceramics in Saitama. He won a prize at the Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition and the Korea Ceramics Biennale in 2009. He was accepted at the Faenza International Ceramic Exhibition in 2011. He held his first individual exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 2012.

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Uchida, Koichi

Koichi Uchida was born in Aichi in 1969. He graduated from the Aichi Prefectural Set Yogyo High School Ceramic Art Advanced Course in 1990. He became independent in 1992, since then, he has energetically been holding solo exhibitions in Japan and overseas. He published a photo album titled UCHIDA KOICHI in 2003.

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Shuji, Ohta

Shuji Ohta was born in Ehime in 1949. He got a job as a lacquer worker in Kamakura in 1981. He learnt the technique of gold-relief lacquer ware under Yosaku Murai in 1983. He became independent at Atsugi, Kanagawa in 1983. Shuji has been holding solo exhibition at our gallery since 1991. He moved his studio to Iyo county, Ehime in 1993.

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Oka, Shingo

Shingo Oka was born in Nagasaki in 1958. After completing his porcelain painting studies at the design department of Saga Prefectural Ceramic Industrial School in 1981, he worked for several ceramic studios in Hizen until 1992. He became independent in West Arita Town in 1993. He moved his studio and established his kiln in Hamatama-cho, Karatsu City in 2003.

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Kamiizumi, Hideto

Hideto Kamiizumi was born in Fukuoka in 1952. He entered Aichi Prefectural Ceramics High School in 1973. He learned ceramic techniques under Kazuya Katsuragi in 1976. He became independent in Ohme, Tokyo in 1988. He has been holding solo exhibitions and joined group exhibitions in various places.

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Kimura, Nobuyuki

Kimura was born in Gojozaka, Kyoto in 1965. He won a premiere prize in competition at the Kinki Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts and the Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts" in 1990. Kimura won a prize in competition at the Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1991. He won a prize in competition at the Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts Kinki and built his own kiln in Shiga prefecture in 1992. He won a premiere prize in competition at the Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts and the encouraging prize called “Menbachi (Pasta Bowl)” of Nisshin Contemporary Ceramic Art, and had an individual exhibition at Takashimaya (one of the major department stores in Japan) in 1995. Since 1996, he has been joining the “Ho-rai” exhibition presented by Uichi Shimizu. He won a prize in competition at “Choza Ceramic Art Exhibition” in 1997. Since this year, he started having individual exhibitions. He had a special exhibition with his father (Morinobu Kimura) and brothers in Sogo (one of the major department stores in Japan) in 1998. He has been having individual exhibitions in Tobu Ikebukuro Department store since 1999. He had an individual exhibition at Eikosha Gallery. He won a prize in competition at the Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts and was accepted as a full member of The Japan Arts and Crafts. He won a prize in competition at the second “Contemporary Tea Pottery” in 2000. Since then, he started having individual exhibitions at Mitsukoshi (one of the major department stores in Japan). Kimura joined a special exhibition called CRIA presented by Kyoto Art Center in 2001.

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Kuriki, Tatsusuke

Tatsusuke Kuriki was born in Seto, Aich in 1943. He entered Kyoto City University of the Arts in 1962. He studied under Kenkichi Tomimoto, Yuzo Kondo and Yoshimichi Fujimoto. After graduating from university in 1966, he went back home and started his career as a ceramic artist under the guidance of his father. He won a prize at Nitten (Japan Fine Arts Exhibition) for the first time in 1967. He won the grand prizes at Asahi Ceramic Exhibition in 1969, 1971 and 1977. He won the grand prizes at the Japan Contemporary Arts and Crafts and the Chinese and Japanese International Ceramic Exhibition in 1974. He won the highest award at the assignment section of the Asahi Ceramic exhibition in 1975. He became independent and established a kiln in 1976. Tatsusuke won the prize of the Japan Ceramic Society in 1977 and the Kusube prize at the Japanese New Arts and Crafts Exhibition in 1981. He became a full-time instructor in the art division at Kyoto City University of the Arts in 1982. After that he moved to Kyoto. He joined several exhibitions held at Suntory Museum of Art and Kure Municipal Museum of Art during that year. He became an assistant professor at Kyoto City University of Arts in 1986. He joined several exhibitions held at the Suntory Museum of Art, Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, Aichi Prefectural Ceramic Museum and many others during that year. He held solo exhibitions in three major cities; Nagoya, Osaka and Tokyo in 1988. Tatsusuke became a professor at Kyoto City University of Arts in 1993.

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Sasayama, Yoshito

Yoshito Sasayama was born in Mie in 1953. He has been creating ceramic works since 1986. He has held solo exhibitions in major cities such as Yokkaichi, Nagoya, Tokyo and Osaka since 1990. He built his own kiln in Iga in 1993.

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Shibayama, Masaru

Masaru Shibayama was born in Tokyo in 1944. He began studying painting, ceramic art and antique art from 1969 to 1974. He built his own kiln in Date City, Hokkaido in 1975. He has been holding solo exhibitions since 1987. He published a photo album entitled Toh (the ceramic) by Masaru Shibayama and Kyoto Shoin (a publishing company) and moved his studio to Toi-cho (Toi Town), Kameda-gun (Kameda County) in 1992.

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Suzuki, Soji

Soji Suzuki was born in Kyoto in 1939. He studied ceramic art under Kenkichi Tomimoto. He graduated from Kyoto-shi Bijutsu Daigaku (Currently, Kyoto City University of Arts) in 1967. He joined at the Nitten exhibition and won a prize for the first time. (From that year on he won consistantly until 1981.) He joined the exhibition entitled Gendai Kogei no Fukan-ten held by the National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto in 1973. He became a professor at Hyogo Women’s Junior College (currently, Hyogo University Junior College) in 1977. He published a photo collection in 2004.

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Takiguchi, Kazuo

Kazuo Takiguchi was born in Kyoto in 1953. He left Doshisha University in 1953. He left Kyoto City University of Arts in 1978. He finished his study at British Royal Academy of the Arts in 1992. He has won several important prizes and awards such as the Foreign Minister Prize at the Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition, the second grand prize at the Chinese and Japanese International Ceramic Art Exhibition, the grand prix at the Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition bestowed by Chichibunomiya, the highest award at the Mokichi Okada Exhibition held by MOA Museum and much more.

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Tsujimura, Kai

Kai Tsujimura was born in Nara in 1976. He has studied starting 1994 under his father, Shiro who is a famous ceramic artist. He built his own kiln in Sakurai City, Nara in 2001. He exhibited for Tea Cup exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 2009 and also for The Premiere of Tea Bowls exhibition, Variety of Sake Cups and Bottles exhibition in 2010. He has been holding solo exhibitions in various places..

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Tsujimura, Yui

Yui Tsujimura was born in Nara in 1975. He has studied starting 1993 under his father, Shiro who is a famous ceramic artist. He was on his own in 2000 and built his own kiln in 2002. He exhibited for The Premiere of Tea Bowls exhibition, Variety of Sake Cups and Bottles exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 2010. He has been holding solo exhibitions in various places.

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Terashima, Yuji

Yuji Terashima was born in Kumamoto in 1949. He built his own kiln in Seto in 1978. he was invited to join the International Ceramic Art Exhibition in Taipei in 1985. He won the grand prize at the Menbachi (Pasta Bowl) Exhibition in Nisshin Contemporary Ceramic Art in 1992. He joined a workshop held by the Portuguese government in 1998. He made a memorial wall in Izu in 1999. He joined the exhibition called Hidari no Utsuwa and Migino Utsuwa (left-hand vessels and right-hand vessels) held by Seto Shinseiki Kogeikan (Seto Ceramics and Glass Art Center) in 2003.

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Naoki, Misa

Misa Naoki was born in Shizuoka in 1947. She studied Japanese traditional painting under her father Tomojiro Naoki, who was a painter and a ceramic artist, and her uncle, Sessai Egawa, who was one of foremost painters in Japan in 1967. She established her own kiln in Kamakura, Kanagawa in 1981. She held an individual exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 1982. She held an individual exhibition at Shibuya Kurodatoen in 2007.

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Nakano, Kinjiro

Kinjiro Nakano was born in Tochigi in 1971. He visited several kiln sites across the country and studied ceramics. He became independent in Tochigi in 1998. He has held solo exhibitions since 2002.

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Nagaoka, Ami

Ami Nagaoka was born in Kyoto in 1946. She learned ceramic art at Takatori, Kyushu in 1966. She also learned in Jagatani, Kyoto in 1967. Ami became independent and built her own kiln in Fujisawa, Kanagawa in 1972. She built another kiln in Ninomiya, Kanagawa in 1986. She has held solo exhibitions at Shibuya Kurodatoen since 2001.

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Nizato, Akio

Akio Nizato was born in Chiba in 1977. He finished his ceramic study at Tajimi City Pottery Design and Technical Center in 2001. He won a prize at the 6th International Ceramic Festival in Mino in 2002. He won a prize at the 41st Asahi Ceramic Exhibition in 2003. He won prizes at the Taiwan Ceramics Biennale in 2004 and Korea Ceramics Biennale in 2005. He won the newcomers award at Faenza International Ceramic Exhibition in 2005. He won a prize at the Myer Foundation International Ceramic Exhibition in Sidney in 2006.

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Fukami, Sueharu

Sueharu Fukami was born in Kyoto in 1947. He won a grand prix at the International Competition of Contemporary Ceramic Art in Faenza, Italy in 1985. He won an award from The Japan Ceramic Society in 1992. He won a Mainichi Arts Award in 1996. He joined the Ten Contemporary Ceramic Artists of the World exhibition held at the Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Faenza in 1999.

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Fukuno, Michitaka

Michitaka Fukuno was born in Saitama in 1970. He studied at Ibaraki Kenritsu Yogyo Shidojo (Ibaraki Prefectural Ceramic Industry Training school)in 1992. He won the first prize at the Ibaraki Prefectural Fine Art Festival in 2001. He won a prize at the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 2002 (He went on to win prizes during 2003-2005). He studied at the Training Institute of Kutani Ware Technique in Ishikawa as an intern sent by the Agency for Cultural Affairs in 2005. He has been a member of the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts board.

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Fujihira, Yasushi

Yasushi Fujihira was born in Kyoto in 1963. (His father Shin Fujihira is also one of the foremost ceramic artists.) he completed his study at Kyoto-furitsu Toko Shokugyo Kunren-ko (Kyoto Prefectural Vocational Training School of Ceramic Art) in 1988. He won the Mayor prize at the Kyo-ten (Kyoto Exhibition) in 1990. He won the prize for encouragement at the Togei Biennale exhibition in 1991.

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Masaki, Shunzo

Shunzo Masaki was born in Ishikawa in 1947. He graduated from Osaka University of the Arts in 1969. Shunzo studied under Seika Suda the 3rd in 1970. He established his studio, named Yamase Tobo, in 1976. He moved his studio to Yamanak Onsen (spa), Kaga City in 1980.

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Wakao, Kei

Kei Wakao was born in Tajimi, Gifu in 1967. He is the second son of Toshisada Wakao who was appointed as Living National Cultural Treasure in Gifu. He graduated from Department of Photography College at the Art collage of Nihon University in 1993. He graduated from Tajimi City Pottery Design And Technical Center in 1995. He won a prize in competition at the Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts in 1997. Kei won the excellent prize in competition at the Exhibition of Asahi Ceramic Arts and Crafts in 1997. He won a prize in competition at the Izushi Jiki Triennale competition in the same year. He won the copper prize in competition at the International Ceramics and Potteries Festival in Mino in 1998. He was invited to join the Kanazawa Wan (Tea Bowl) One Grand Prix in 1998. He was invited to join the exhibition of 20th Century Ceramic at the Shigaraki Pottery Forest in 1999. Kei joined the Shokuno Utsuwa Exhibition at Mitsukoshi, one of the major department stores, in 2001. He had an individual exhibition at Tenmaya (another well known department store) in Hiroshima in 2002. He held a joint exhibition at Abeno-Kintetsu Exhibition in Osaka in 2003. He also joined several exhibitions during 2003. He held an individual exhibition at Matsuzakaya (another major department store) in 2004. He started having individual exhibitions at Shibuya Kurodatoen since 2004. He also joined several exhibitions during 2004. He held an individual exhibition at Kintetsu (another major department store) Yokkaichi in 2005. Kei had several exhibitions in 2006. He also joined several exhibitions during 2006.

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Watanabe, Akihiko

Akihiko Watanabe was born in Yamagata in 1959. He built his first kiln named Raijin-yo in Hirashimizu of Yamagata in 1983. He built an anagama (underground kiln) in 1993. He visited old kiln sites called Kan-yo and Ryusen-yo of the Southern Song dynasty in China in 1994. He built an anagama in Shizuoka in 2008. He is a member of the Japanese Traditional Arts and Crafts Organization.

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Shibuya KURODATOEN